Avoiding the 7 deadly wastes in your BIM process Part 1

Part 1

Inefficient workflows lead to missed deadlines, lost opportunities, lost
profits, and potentially lost reputation. The news is that design firms
can do something about it.

 

Free download

For many architecture and engineering firms, the past decade of building information modeling (BIM) adoption has been challenging. New technology has brought new processes and new skillsets to our design professionals. For some, the transition to BIM has been easier than others, but for all, there was always some lingering doubt that their teams could be doing more and better.

BIM processes have been stood up in organizations just like any new business methodology. Just as organizations might change accounting practices, onboarding practices for new hires, or going after a new business line, their BIM practices are starting to get the same scrutiny. With this need to find more efficient practices or improved second, design firms are starting to review current practices with performance-based metrics in the context of making changes to the workflow.

For most design organizations, BIM tools have been treated like the next version of CAD. Many would argue that CAD was not implemented efficiently or effectively in the first place. If an issue is found to be slowing the process, it was usually labeled as a software problem. More savvy CAD or BIM managers realize that often with static software, workflow changes need to be implemented with new tools. The most enlightened managers and leaders also recognize that people are a major deciding factor in how efficient and effective their operations are. It is obvious for many that all these factors contribute to BIM-enabled workflows not being the most effective or most efficient processes in delivering professional work.

Inefficient workflows lead to missed deadlines, lost opportunities, lost profits, and potentially lost reputation. The news is that design firms can do something about it. If your organization recognizes that you’re leaving money on the table because of inefficiency and ineffectiveness in your workflow, the first step is to recognize that things can improve and that the team should not settle for sub-par performance.

Read full white paper Avoiding the 7 deadly wastes in your BIM process, part 1

Download now